The City listens

J.S. Nature Farms. The owner has been farming for 50+ years
J.S. Nature farms. The owner has been farming for 50+ years

Hunters are members of the local Rod and Gun Club. The Club wrote to the City about the problems hunters had getting permission from owners given that “many land owners in Richmond live overseas.” (See 4(ii))

Surprisingly members of the Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services Committee  moved and seconded  “That staff examine the regulations surrounding hunting on farmland and the necessary requirements for licensed hunters to continue hunting and report back.”

Neighbours quickly passed around this information, and wrote letters about how easy it is to use Land Titles information to confirm that  property owners are local.

“We’re here, not overseas,” became the rallying call.

Property owners wrote to the city about their property rights being violated by hunters.

Helmut Pastrick in his orchard (Cherry tree)
Helmut Pastrick in his orchard

“This is a property rights issue and owners of farmland should have the right to determine who is on their property,” said Helmut Pastrick, a hobby farmer,  “If someone gets hurt of worse, we’re the ones who will be sued.”

Neighbours emailed Council members asking them to come and talk to local owners before making any decisions.

Councillor Derek Dang who grew up on farmland agreed with local residents and became an advocate.

At its June 2014 meeting, the Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services Committee released its findings, noting “the overall principles and actions of the Firearms Regulation Bylaw 4183 are sound and should be maintained in their present form.”

Horses on Finn Road
Horses on Finn Road. If a hunter disturbs a horse of this size, the rider could lose control

Sounds of gunfire ceased, until last Sunday, when a recreational hunter was back.

Now we’re on the lookout and will be phoning City Bylaws and the RCMP to enforce the bylaw and charge the hunters under the section 39 of the Wildlife Act.